I recently had my slide film scanned from my participation with Cordell Expeditions in 1988 as a diver/photographer when we were the first divers to explore a remote seamount 4 miles off the coast of Pt. Sur, California. Back then these were heady dives to depths exceeding 150 feet in the open ocean while fighting strong currents and sometimes rough seas. More about this adventure here.

Nautical Chart showing the shallow underwater sea mount off Pt. Sur, CA

My gear at the time, double 72 CF tanks, Nikonos V camera with large Ikelite underwater strobe.

Rough conditions with the my boat on site tied to the descent line, the grey inflatable would shuttle us between the Cordell Explorer and the decent line.

Massive hydrocoral and clear water down 120 feet. Malfunction of my film camera resulted in the line on the right side of the frame.

At the end of each trip a group photo was in order.

It has been 30 years since I last had an opportunity to explore what lies beneath the surface of the Pacific Ocean off the coast of Big Sur, California. The last time, I was a diver/photographer for Cordell Expeditions exploring and documenting a remote seamount 2 miles off shore from Pt. Sur. During the expeditions conditions would not always allow us time to dive on the seamount – “Schmieder Bank” (the seamount was later named after our expedition leader Dr. Robert Schmieder). We would make the most of what ever mother nature served up and explore the near shore coastline along Big Sur. Fast forward 30 years later and I joined a group of experienced divers aboard the Truth Aquatics – Vision dive boat.  We set off at 3am on a foggy Friday morning and headed north to the remote coastline off Big Sur. We spent 3 days diving remote off shore pinnacles including the famous “Jade Cove“. Underwater photography, even with the advent of digital photography remains one of the most challenging forms of photography but also one of the most rewarding!

Video from this trip – Diving Big Sur 2018

This is a clip from a year long project to document the construction of a Sonoma County wine country custom home. The project started in January, 2018 with both still photos and video of the construction process and will wrap up once the home is completed by the end of this year.

Santa Rosa Fire Department’s first recruit class of 2018 begin their journey with a 6 week intensive training academy to get them ready to join the ranks of the department as Firefighter Paramedics.

Luck came my way while at a planned trip to Bodega Bay, on my birthday no less! A Super Blue Blood Moon was scheduled for early on the January 31st 2018. After some research into timing, position and finding a compelling foreground for this event, the last factor was the weather. Certainly not every photo shoot comes out exactly as planned and one thing I have found is that it is good to have a pre-plan but just as important is to be flexible and ever vigilant for moments that exceed your preconceptions. The last time there was two full moons in the same month (blue moon), a total eclipse of the moon (blood moon) and the moon being extra close to the earth (super moon) was over 150 years ago. The next one is just around the corner in 2037!

Peregrine Falcon, a resident of the Sonoma County Coast while they love to eat pigeons, on the coast shore birds are the meal of choice. This is a pretty typical spot for a Peregrine to hang out waiting for prey.

Ice diving in Alberta Canada – Lake Minnewanka, Banff National Park with Adventures in Scuba Dive shop from Calgary and Dolphin Dive shop from Sacramento, California. Under the ice at this location is a dam built in 1912 to provide hydroelectric power to the community of Banff Canada. The top of the dam was 30 feet below the ice and we dove to 70 feet, exploring the dam, block house and other features of a hydroelectric facility. Water temperature was in the low 30’s with visibility a good 30 feet.

Prior to diving a day was spent setting up the site including creating rings and spokes by clearing the snow to create a “road map” that can be seen underwater that shows the way back to the entry point.

Setting up the dive tent in 50mph gusts from chinook winds.

Gear had to be hauled over 1/3 of a mile from the parking lot on to the ice to the dive tent including all dive gear and over 50 scuba tanks.

Truck load of dive tanks.

Cutting through 18+ inches of ice to create a triangle hole large enough for 3 divers to enter and exit the water at a time.

Attaching tether line to divers as the prepare for a dive.

Ready…set….go!

Warming up with hot water between dives in the 33 degree water.

View through an ice block of the spectacular Canadian Rockies.

The group…